2011 Amerilite 255BH
2011
Amerilite
255BH
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2012 Amerilite 239BH
2012
Amerilite
239BH
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2013 KZ Sportsmen S270RKSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S270RKSS
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2013 KZ Sportsmen S242SBHSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S242SBHSS
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1998 Coachmen Catalina 320MBS
1998
Coachmen
Catalina 320MBS
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2014 Travel Lite 890SBRX
2014
Travel Lite
890SBRX
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2014 Travel Lite 960RX
2014
Travel Lite
960RX
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2007 Nissan Versa S Hatchback 4D
2007
Nissan
Versa
S Hatchback 4D
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2013 KZ Spree Escape E14RB
2013
KZ Spree Escape
E14RB
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2008 Thor Jazz 2550RL
2008
Thor
Jazz 2550RL
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WELCOME TO AUTOMOTION MOTORS

Employee pricing is on now. We are clearing out every RV and vehicle on our lot right now. We are making a major purchase and so we are selling off everything. Get in here today. You wont believe the savings!


Our job is to gather all the information required to get you the RV or the vehicle and financing you deserve, and then we go to work for you, Instead of you driving all over town or making dozens of calls. You can relax while we do the work, so your time is well spent. We are committed to finding the right deal for you.


Automotion Motors & RV is extremely pleased to announce that we are British Columbia's newest dealer for KZ RV. This is a major achievement and has been in the works for quite a while. We believe this line will compliment our Lance trailers very well and give customers looking for lightweight trailers a fantastic lineup that is unmatched anywhere in the industry.  To see all of the KZ RVs check out their link at http://www.kz-rv.com/ .If you see the perfect floorplan for you give us a call and we can factory order your new trailer exactly how you would like it! Look for more announcements soon....
CONTACT US
Automotion Motors
2- 7225 Dallas Dr.
Kamloops, BC V2C 4S9
(250) 573-0064
Fax: (250) 573-1972
STORE HOURS
Weekdays: 9am - 5pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm
Sunday: Closed

Clearance RVs and Vehicles

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The Camping Source Cooking Tips

Creating campsite meals and treats is fun for the whole family.There are as many ways to enjoy food and fun in the great outdoors as there are wonderful things to do and see. The Camping Source shares pre-trip ideas, cooking methods, and handy tips to make your The Camping Source campsite cooking an open-air taste sensation.

  • Measure dry goods for each meal, pack in zip-loc bags, and label.
  • Chop vegetables (onions, peppers, carrots, etc.) and pack in zip-locs.
  • Prepare snacks (veggie sticks, trail mix, energy bars, etc.) and pack in zip-locs.
  • Resealable boxes of broth (beef, chicken) store well and come in very handy.
  • Pre-cook noodles, rice, etc. for quick reheating at the campsite.
  • Block ice lasts longer in your cooler than cubes.

Here’s a handy checklist of The Camping Source supplies to make sure you don’t forget a thing.

___ heavy duty aluminum foil
___ zip-loc freezer bags in several sizes
___ disposable plates/bowls/hot-cold cups/flatware
___ coffee/cocoa/tea cups
___ salt/pepper/sugar/dry spices
___ powdered milk/can of evaporated milk
___ coffee/filters/cocoa mix/tea bags
___ paper towels
___ trash bags
___ can/bottle opener/corkscrew
___ plastic flexible cutting board
___ metal cooking utensils – tongs/spatula/grill forks/serving spoons/hot dog-marshmallow sticks/knife
___ metal measuring cups/spoons
___ serving bowl(s)
___ plastic tablecloth/table cloth clips or weights
___ leftover food storage containers
___ pot-pan with lid/skillet
___ foil cooking tins
___ non stick cooking spray or spray bottle filled with oil
___ oven mitts/pot holders
___ dish pan/bio-degradable dish soap/dish towels/sponge-scrubby
___ strike anywhere matches
___ butane stick lighter
___ firestarters
And don’t forget the:
___ BBQ grill/smoker
___ propane/charcoal
___ firewood (in case none is available)
___ grill top for campfire ring
___ dutch oven
___ crockpot (use only if camping in a “wild animal safe” area)
___ propane stove

Now You’re CookingYou’re prepared and ready to cook!! There are several methods of campsite cooking to choose from – try one or try several. The Camping Source recipe page offers great ideas using these methods. Some camper favorites include:

  • Foil pouches are neat treats and time savers, too. They are the perfect method or cooking with a campfire. On a large piece of heavy duty foil place your seasoned meat, veggie pieces (sliced, julienned, etc.), diced potatoes, and a pat of butter or oil. Add an ice cube or two, fold and seal all edges tightly, and place on the grill. The pouch contents retain their moisture and flavor. Serve pouch on plate and watch their eyes light up.
  • Dutch Oven – a dutch oven is a deep cast iron or aluminum pot with a tight fitting lid that doesn’t allow steam to escape – thus delivering a moist and flavorful dish.
  • Crockpots offer set and forget, one pot style GoCamping campsite cooking. Simply assemble your recipe ingredients in the crockpot in the morning and go enjoy the day. When you return home you’ll be greeted by mouthwatering smells and a ready to go supper.Before using the crockpot method outdoors, be sure to check with your camp hosts about hungry wild animals in the area. If it’s bear or other critter country crockpotting is not for this trip!!
  • Feeling adventurous?? Try an old scouting standby – the box oven. It’s said to work well and turns mealtime into an educational science project.

Tips and TricksSo now you’re an expert. Take along these general Camping Source tips:

  • Clean your grill by rubbing it with a fist size ball of aluminum foil.
  • All items in your cooler should be contained in watertight zip-loc bags.
  • Cover cooking pots – the contents will heat quicker and the lids will keep foreign objects out.
  • Use frozen slices of bread when preparing a “brown bag” lunch – when you’re ready to eat, the bread is defrosted and fresh.
  • Clean out your fridge or cooler by making omelets the last morning of your trip using all leftover meats and veggies.
  • Keep marshmallows from sticking together by adding some powdered sugar to the bag.
  • Swap Hershey’s chocolate with Peppermint Patties for a refreshing twist on the s’more.
  • Remember to leave the campsite and fire ring as clean or cleaner than when you arrived.
        reprinted from http://www.thecampingsource.com
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Ants:  these little pests can make life miserable.  To prevent them, spread a little borax or Comet with bleach around tires, jacks, water line, anything that enters your camper.  This works great if you are camping for one or two days.  Another great tip is to spread petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or some sort of lubricating grease on about the last two inches of the water line and power cord (easily wiped off with a paper towel).  Ants just can't navigate over this sticky substance.  Camping for several days???  Spread cornmeal around areas that show ant activity.  Another idea - Terro is a commerical product available at Walmart or other similar stores.

Squirrels:  They just love those LP hoses.   What they don't like is cayenne pepper or Tabasco.  Not sure how long Tabasco works, but worth a try.  Also heard the folowing are effective:  Use double sided tape around the hoses and sprinkle cayenne pepper over the tape; buy stainless steel spring hose protectors (available at some auto part dealers or online); ultrasonic pest controllers that deter mice and squirrels.  Warning:  don't put poison out as that can be lethal to household pets as well as the squirrels.

Mice:  What man doesn't love a woman screaming at the sight of a mouse????  Best deterrent is to keep all food covered and make sure there are no tiny holes in the camper that allow mice to squeeze through.  Best way to check is wait for dark, then light up the interior of the trailer, opening cabinet doors then go underneath the trailer and look for slivers of light.  Go back to the source and fill with steel wool and expanding sealant (don't overdo). OR, do the opposite and light up underneath the camper, go inside the dark camper and open cabinet doors and look for those slivers of light.  Again, fill with steel wool and expanding sealant.  Ultrasonic pest controllers do a pretty good job.  In some cases, putting dryer sheets into all the recesses of the camper can deter mice and leave the camper smelling nice.  Moth balls in a plastic bag with holes poked through work great, but I find a single way to get rid of that stinky moth ball smell except time - lots of time. We also have a product called Mouse Free that will prevent the entry of mice,ants and other unwanted critters. It is no drip, no mess, and non-toxic and will work in motorhomes, tent trailers, travel trailers, and fifth wheels. Call Automotion at 1-250-573-2475 and ask for pricing for the do it yourself kit or have us do it for you.

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February 25, 2013 -- RV Trader

Camping season means lots of folks will be out driving RVs and towing trailers. MBA insurance, a leading RV rental insurance company, recently informed us of the five most common insurance claims for RVs. These claims include hitting concrete islands at gas pumps, hitting obstacles when making right turns, hitting overhead obstructions, backing the RV into something and side swipe damage to the RV.

Today I would like to offer some RV driving tips and hints to help you avoid becoming a statistic in these top 5 RV insurance claims.

1) Accidents at the Gas Pump: The leading insurance claim is hitting concrete islands or poles at the gas pump. The reason this is the leading cause of accidents is because there are two ways it can happen. If you are turning away from the pole or island tail swing is the culprit. If you are turning towards the pole or island turning before you reach the pivot point is the culprit. To learn how to avoid accidents at the gas pump from happening view the video posted above to learn how to avoid accidents at the gas pump.

2) Right Turns: Making right turns made the list of top five RV insurance claims for the same reason as gas station accidents. When you make a right turn in an RV you need to drive out further than you are accustomed to before you start into the turn. If you start to make a right turn too early, before your pivot point clears an object, it can result in hitting an object or driving over a curb. When you make a right turn tail swing applies too. If you are too close to an object on the opposite side of the direction you are turning your tail swing can hit the object.

3) Height of RVs: When you drive an automobile height is not a concern. An average size vehicle can drive through or under any bridge, tunnel, overpass or fast food drive-thru that you encounter. But, when you are driving a motorhome or towing a trailer you need to constantly be aware of heights. It’s not uncommon for RVs to exceed 12 feet in height. When you are traveling on back roads an overpass that you could easily clear in an automobile can result in serious damage to your RV. I recommend measuring your RV at the highest point from the ground, and write the height down where it is easy to see as a constant reminder.

4) Backing the RV: Backing an automobile is easy because it is small and you can look over your shoulder and see where you are going. This is not true with a motorhome or trailer. It is larger and you cannot just look over your shoulder and back up. It requires practice to become proficient at backing an RV. For starters you should always try to avoid backing from your right side. This is your blindside. It is much easier to back from your left. The best method for backing is to have a spotter guide you. You need to be able to communicate using hand signals or radios. The spotter needs to be positioned where they can be seen in your mirror. This means the spotter may need to move as you turn and back. You should always be able to see each other’s faces during the backing maneuver. If something doesn’t look right, stop, get out and look. If you need to back without assistance walk the area first. Establish predetermined stop points, and then stop, get out and check when you reach that predetermined point. Repeat this process as many times as necessary. Before you start backing tap your horn to warn people around you. Always be on the lookout for small children and pets.

5) Roof & Side Swipe Damage: Number five on the list is a big one. It goes back to driving a smaller automobile again. In a car you don’t need to be concerned with tree branches and other overhead obstacles, or with sideswiping the overhang of a roof or hitting a mirror on a bridge. Always keep in mind a motohome or trailer is wider and taller than an automobile. When you add mirrors and awnings it’s even wider and with items like roof mounted air conditioners and antennas it’s taller too. When you arrive at the campground you need to get out and look before attempting to park the unit on the site. Tree branches and other overhead obstacles can easily damage the roof and sides of the RV.

This was a crash course on driving and towing an RV but it should help when it comes to avoiding the top five RV insurance claims. If you would like to learn more about how to properly and safely drive an RV check out our DVD titles and instant video downloads below.

Happy RV Learning!

-Mark Polk RV Education 101

 
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January Special: All RV units receive 3 extra years of warranty! All vehicles have a 90 day powertrain warranty!

 
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