2012 Amerilite 239BH
2012
Amerilite
239BH
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2014 Travel Lite 770P
2014
Travel Lite
770P
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2002 Chrysler 300M Sedan 4D
2002
Chrysler
300M
Sedan 4D
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2008 Thor Jazz 2550RL
2008
Thor
Jazz 2550RL
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2014 Travel Lite 960RX
2014
Travel Lite
960RX
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1998 Coachmen Catalina 320MBS
1998
Coachmen
Catalina 320MBS
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2013 KZ Spree Escape E14RB
2013
KZ Spree Escape
E14RB
Click Here For Details
2014 Travel Lite 960RX
2014
Travel Lite
960RX
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2013 KZ Sportsmen S242SBHSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S242SBHSS
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2013 KZ Sportsmen S270RKSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S270RKSS
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WELCOME TO AUTOMOTION MOTORS

Employee pricing is on now. We are clearing out every RV and vehicle on our lot right now. We are making a major purchase and so we are selling off everything. Get in here today. You wont believe the savings!


Our job is to gather all the information required to get you the RV or the vehicle and financing you deserve, and then we go to work for you, Instead of you driving all over town or making dozens of calls. You can relax while we do the work, so your time is well spent. We are committed to finding the right deal for you.


Automotion has added the Travel Lite line-up of campers to our already fantastic selection of campers and trailers. We believe the Travel Lite line will compliment the Lance Campers very nicely by offering smaller light weight floorplans that will fit in anything from a Ford Ranger to a Dodge Dakota to a super crew Ford and larger. We think you will love some of the neat ideas these campers contain such as granicote countertops and European sinks and stoves that completely hideaway when you are done using them so you have a total countertop at your disposal. Prices are fantastic so used camper shoppers will want to see what their dollar will buy them first. Check out the lineup at http://www.travellitecampers.com/
CONTACT US
Automotion Motors
2- 7225 Dallas Dr.
Kamloops, BC V2C 4S9
(250) 573-0064
Fax: (250) 573-1972
STORE HOURS
Weekdays: 9am - 5pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm
Sunday: Closed

Clearance RVs and Vehicles

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Please refer to the following trailer hitch class information if you have questions about how trailer hitch classes are determined. When choosing a hitch, we recommend you consider your current towing needs as well as future needs. A bicycle rack today may turn into a power boat next year. If in doubt, it’s best to select a higher class. 

NOTE: Always choose a hitch that is strong enough to handle the maximum anticipated total weight of the trailer but does not exceed the towing capacity of your vehicle. Refer to your vehicle's owner’s manual for maximum towing and tongue weight limitations. The trailer tongue load should be kept at 10 percent of the loaded trailer weight for weight-carrying* (dead-weight) trailer hitches, and 12 percent for weight-distributing** (equalizing) trailer hitches. Also, you may want need to consider vehicle modifications that might be beneficial, such as stiffer springs, air springs, overload or air assist shocks, larger sway bars or automatic transmission fluid (ATF) cooler. Such modifications may be needed on vehicles used for heavy towing or long-distance towing. 

Class I Hitches 

This is the lightest type of trailer hitch. A Class 1 trailer hitch can handle a gross trailer weight (GTW) of up to 2,000 lbs., and a maximum tongue weight of 200 lbs. The hitch may be a simple drawbar-type hitch or step bumper-type hitch. Other hitches may have a crossbar with a small one-inch or 1-1/2-inch square receiver, or a small 2-inch by 5/8-inch receiver. This type of hitch is often used on smaller cars, smaller pickups and smaller vans (minivans) for bicycle racks, camping racks, and light-duty towing. We sell many fine class 1 hitches as well as an economical, easy to install (do-it-yourself) Class 1 trailer hitch.

Class II Hitches

Class II hitches are for loads of up to 3,500 lbs. GTW and 300 lbs. tongue weight such as a small boat trailer, snowmobile trailer, motorcycle trailer or camper. This type of trailer hitch is appropriate for larger cars, full-size vans, full-size pickups and SUVs. Many of our class II hitches are designed specifically for your vehicle, and we have some universal class II trailer hitches as well.

Class III Hitches

Class III hitches can handle up to 5,000 lbs. GTW and 500 lbs. tongue weight. This type of hitch generally has a 2-inch rectangular receiver and is considered the "standard" type of hitch for general towing. Most of our class III hitches are designed specifically for your vehicle. There are also some universal-fit class III trailer hitches available.

Class IV Hitches

Class IV hitches are for up to 10,000 lbs. GTW and 1,000 to 1,200 lbs. of tongue weight. This type of hitch is usually a weight-distributing hitch. We carry many fine class IV hitches that are designed specifically for your vehicle.

Class V Hitches

Class V hitches are for extra heavy loads greater than 10,000 lbs. GTW and more than 1,200 lbs. tongue weight. This type of hitch is usually a weight-distributing hitch. This type of hitch may have up to a 2-1/2 inch receiver with a 3/4-inch pinhole. Typical uses might be to tow a car trailer, horse trailer or unusually large boat or camper.

5th Wheel and Gooseneck Hitches

5th wheel and gooseneck hitches mount in the bed of your pickup truck.

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* Dead-Weight Hitch: Or "weight carrying" hitch is the type of trailer hitch most people think of when they consider trailer hitches. It is the basic trailer hitch that provides a simple ball-and-socket arrangement to connect the trailer to the towing vehicle. Intended for (usually) lighter loads.

** Weight-Distributing Hitch: This type of hitch has an attachment that slides into the receiver to redistribute the weight on the tongue. The hitch usually has two spring bars, one for each side of the trailer, to lift and apply leverage to the tow vehicle. This redistributes weight from the rear axle to the front and improves vehicle stability while towing. Intended for heavy loads.  

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February 25, 2013 -- RV Trader

Camping season means lots of folks will be out driving RVs and towing trailers. MBA insurance, a leading RV rental insurance company, recently informed us of the five most common insurance claims for RVs. These claims include hitting concrete islands at gas pumps, hitting obstacles when making right turns, hitting overhead obstructions, backing the RV into something and side swipe damage to the RV.

Today I would like to offer some RV driving tips and hints to help you avoid becoming a statistic in these top 5 RV insurance claims.

1) Accidents at the Gas Pump: The leading insurance claim is hitting concrete islands or poles at the gas pump. The reason this is the leading cause of accidents is because there are two ways it can happen. If you are turning away from the pole or island tail swing is the culprit. If you are turning towards the pole or island turning before you reach the pivot point is the culprit. To learn how to avoid accidents at the gas pump from happening view the video posted above to learn how to avoid accidents at the gas pump.

2) Right Turns: Making right turns made the list of top five RV insurance claims for the same reason as gas station accidents. When you make a right turn in an RV you need to drive out further than you are accustomed to before you start into the turn. If you start to make a right turn too early, before your pivot point clears an object, it can result in hitting an object or driving over a curb. When you make a right turn tail swing applies too. If you are too close to an object on the opposite side of the direction you are turning your tail swing can hit the object.

3) Height of RVs: When you drive an automobile height is not a concern. An average size vehicle can drive through or under any bridge, tunnel, overpass or fast food drive-thru that you encounter. But, when you are driving a motorhome or towing a trailer you need to constantly be aware of heights. It’s not uncommon for RVs to exceed 12 feet in height. When you are traveling on back roads an overpass that you could easily clear in an automobile can result in serious damage to your RV. I recommend measuring your RV at the highest point from the ground, and write the height down where it is easy to see as a constant reminder.

4) Backing the RV: Backing an automobile is easy because it is small and you can look over your shoulder and see where you are going. This is not true with a motorhome or trailer. It is larger and you cannot just look over your shoulder and back up. It requires practice to become proficient at backing an RV. For starters you should always try to avoid backing from your right side. This is your blindside. It is much easier to back from your left. The best method for backing is to have a spotter guide you. You need to be able to communicate using hand signals or radios. The spotter needs to be positioned where they can be seen in your mirror. This means the spotter may need to move as you turn and back. You should always be able to see each other’s faces during the backing maneuver. If something doesn’t look right, stop, get out and look. If you need to back without assistance walk the area first. Establish predetermined stop points, and then stop, get out and check when you reach that predetermined point. Repeat this process as many times as necessary. Before you start backing tap your horn to warn people around you. Always be on the lookout for small children and pets.

5) Roof & Side Swipe Damage: Number five on the list is a big one. It goes back to driving a smaller automobile again. In a car you don’t need to be concerned with tree branches and other overhead obstacles, or with sideswiping the overhang of a roof or hitting a mirror on a bridge. Always keep in mind a motohome or trailer is wider and taller than an automobile. When you add mirrors and awnings it’s even wider and with items like roof mounted air conditioners and antennas it’s taller too. When you arrive at the campground you need to get out and look before attempting to park the unit on the site. Tree branches and other overhead obstacles can easily damage the roof and sides of the RV.

This was a crash course on driving and towing an RV but it should help when it comes to avoiding the top five RV insurance claims. If you would like to learn more about how to properly and safely drive an RV check out our DVD titles and instant video downloads below.

Happy RV Learning!

-Mark Polk RV Education 101

 
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December 10, 2012 -- RV Trader

Waste water is an often overlooked element of going greener while enjoying the RV lifestyle, but one that plays a huge role in the calculation of our environmental footprint. In order to treat waste while living in an RV, it is necessary to use products that both eliminate odors and help to break down and liquefy solid waste. But conventional holding tank deodorizers and treatment chemicals use highly toxic ingredients like formaldehyde and ammonia. Fortunately there are now newer and greener product alternatives that rely instead upon natural enzyme-based and bacterial formulas to break down waste and reduce foul odors.

                           

There are several reasons why many RV owners are switching over to these more eco-conscious products for use in toilet and waste storage tank systems. One of the main benefits is that while chemicals such as formaldehyde and ammonia may be highly effective at destroying the odor-causing bacteria found in waste, they also destroy the 'good' kinds of bacteria that are needed in order to break down solid waste in septic systems. Plus, the more that RV owners use potentially hazardous chemicals to treat waste water, the more those chemicals also enter into campground septic systems ' which increases the risk that those chemicals will enter into municipal sewage systems that may not be equipped to adequately treat them before they are discharged into bodies of water like rivers and streams. Adding concentrated doses of naturally occurring bacteria and enzymes to holding tanks, on the other hand, helps to accelerate the decomposition of waste without formaldehyde ' making the whole process much safer.

                           

One company that offers consumers a wide range of more environmentally friendly RV toilet chemicals and related products is Thetford. They sell a line of holding-tank deodorants that meet strict environmental standards for toxicity, bio-safety levels and biodegradability. Their formaldehyde-free formulas also perform on par with conventional formaldehyde-containing deodorants when it comes to breaking down waste and tissue and preventing clogs. Non-toxic detergent additives in the products also help to keep tanks clean to further reduce odor and ensure that they work efficiently. Because of their commitment to creating greener RV products, Thetford has been granted special Design for the Environment (DfE) status in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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January Special: All RV units receive 3 extra years of warranty! All vehicles have a 90 day powertrain warranty!

 
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