WELCOME TO AUTOMOTION MOTORS

Employee pricing is on now. We are clearing out every RV and vehicle on our lot right now. We are making a major purchase and so we are selling off everything. Get in here today. You wont believe the savings!


Our job is to gather all the information required to get you the RV or the vehicle and financing you deserve, and then we go to work for you, Instead of you driving all over town or making dozens of calls. You can relax while we do the work, so your time is well spent. We are committed to finding the right deal for you.


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APR as Low as..
7.5%
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*On Approved Credit
2013 Little Guy  T@B CS-Floorplan tear drop trailer
2013
Little Guy
T@B CS-Floorplan
tear drop trailer
Click Here For Details
2011 Streamlite Sport SS27BKS
2011
Streamlite Sport
SS27BKS
Click Here For Details
2013 KZ Sportsmen S270RKSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S270RKSS
Click Here For Details
2013 KZ Sportsmen S242SBHSS
2013
KZ
Sportsmen S242SBHSS
Click Here For Details
2014 Travel Lite 890SBRX
2014
Travel Lite
890SBRX
Click Here For Details
2014 Travel Lite 960RX
2014
Travel Lite
960RX
Click Here For Details
2011 Amerilite 255BH
2011
Amerilite
255BH
Click Here For Details
2012 Amerilite 239BH
2012
Amerilite
239BH
Click Here For Details
2014 KZ Spree 261RKS
2014
KZ Spree
261RKS
Click Here For Details
2013 KZ Spree Escape E14RB
2013
KZ Spree Escape
E14RB
Click Here For Details
We are pleased to announce that we have become the newest dealer in BC for Little Guy RV. These ultra lightweight trailers are the smallest we could find on the market. You can tow these trailers with a car or a jeep even and still be off the ground warm and toasty while enjoying a great nights sleep in our beautiful outdoors. Come and see what we have to offer as these little trailers will shock you for what they hold and the options they can offer. Off road trailers and toy haulers are also part of the package and you can see more of the lineup at http://www.golittleguy.com/teardrops/index.php
CONTACT US
Automotion Motors
2- 7225 Dallas Dr.
Kamloops, BC V2C 4S9
(250) 573-0064
Fax: (250) 573-1972
STORE HOURS
Weekdays: 9am - 5pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm
Sunday: Closed

Clearance RVs and Vehicles

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December 10, 2012 -- RV Trader

Waste water is an often overlooked element of going greener while enjoying the RV lifestyle, but one that plays a huge role in the calculation of our environmental footprint. In order to treat waste while living in an RV, it is necessary to use products that both eliminate odors and help to break down and liquefy solid waste. But conventional holding tank deodorizers and treatment chemicals use highly toxic ingredients like formaldehyde and ammonia. Fortunately there are now newer and greener product alternatives that rely instead upon natural enzyme-based and bacterial formulas to break down waste and reduce foul odors.

                           

There are several reasons why many RV owners are switching over to these more eco-conscious products for use in toilet and waste storage tank systems. One of the main benefits is that while chemicals such as formaldehyde and ammonia may be highly effective at destroying the odor-causing bacteria found in waste, they also destroy the 'good' kinds of bacteria that are needed in order to break down solid waste in septic systems. Plus, the more that RV owners use potentially hazardous chemicals to treat waste water, the more those chemicals also enter into campground septic systems ' which increases the risk that those chemicals will enter into municipal sewage systems that may not be equipped to adequately treat them before they are discharged into bodies of water like rivers and streams. Adding concentrated doses of naturally occurring bacteria and enzymes to holding tanks, on the other hand, helps to accelerate the decomposition of waste without formaldehyde ' making the whole process much safer.

                           

One company that offers consumers a wide range of more environmentally friendly RV toilet chemicals and related products is Thetford. They sell a line of holding-tank deodorants that meet strict environmental standards for toxicity, bio-safety levels and biodegradability. Their formaldehyde-free formulas also perform on par with conventional formaldehyde-containing deodorants when it comes to breaking down waste and tissue and preventing clogs. Non-toxic detergent additives in the products also help to keep tanks clean to further reduce odor and ensure that they work efficiently. Because of their commitment to creating greener RV products, Thetford has been granted special Design for the Environment (DfE) status in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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Updated: Thu, 16 May 2013 11:19:05 GMT | By Alexandra Posadzki, The Canadian Press, thecanadianpress.com

TORONTO - July Ono had been buying used cars online for years without problems.

So she was stunned when she got a panicked phone call three years ago from a friend saying the Jeep Ono bought a month earlier was being towed away by a bailiff.

In hindsight, Ono says she had been suspicious of the tall, charming stranger who had posted his car for sale on Craigslist.

"I was sitting there going, July, there's just something wrong with this person," said the 50-year-old real estate investment adviser. "But I just couldn't figure out what it was."

Ono took the vehicle for a test drive and had it inspected at a dealership. Everything seemed to be in working order.

It was only when Ono got the late-night call while out of town on business that she discovered the seller had used it as collateral on a loan a month earlier.

Online car classifieds can offer convenience and bargain prices, but experts recommend taking precautions to protect yourself from scammers and "curbsiders," full-time fraud artists pretending to be private sellers.

About one in five Canadians who buy or sell used cars online encounter scammers or fraud, according to a recent report by the Automobile Consumer Coalition.

Out of more than 1,000 people polled, 13 per cent said they were contacted by fraudulent buyers who offered to overpay for their car with a phoney cheque, asking the seller to refund the difference.

Another 12 per cent came across listings posted by suspected curbsiders.

Yet 76 per cent of respondents said they weren't worried about fraud.

Online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population, according to the polling industry's professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association.

Approximately 600,000 of the three million used cars that Canadians buy and sell each year are sold on sites like Craigslist and Kijiji, according to research compiled by the coalition.

"This problem is going to get worse and worse," said Mohamed Bouchama, director of the Toronto-based consumer advocacy group.

"More people are using the Internet because of the convenience. Lots of people don't want to go visit five, six, seven dealerships."

George Iny, director of the Automobile Protection Association, recommends looking for mid-priced cars rather than going for the cheapest one listed when you're shopping for used vehicles.

"Don't be a price junkie," said Iny. "The seller always knows more than you. If the car is priced below market, it's almost always for a reason."

Buying junk will often cost you more in the long run, as you foot the bill for pricey repairs.

"The cost of taking something that's in average condition and making it good condition is higher than the premium you'd pay just to buy the same vehicle in good condition," said Iny.

When buying a used car, Iny and Bouchama both recommend getting it inspected before you fork over the cash. You can either take the vehicle to a garage, or look for a mobile inspector who will come to you.

Always ask to see the vehicle ownership and the seller's driver's licence to make sure the names match, said Bouchama.

Check the car's history, which will show you how many times the car transferred ownership, if it was a write-off or if it's been in a major accident.

Bouchama suggests buying from a dealer because of the added level of accountability. But if you're going to do so, Iny recommends keeping a sharp eye out for hidden fees.

Provincial laws in Ontario, Quebec, B.C. and Alberta require all-in pricing, but violations do occur.

"The advantage of the dealers is that if there is a problem, there's somebody you can sue," said Iny.

"A private seller may not be around, or you won't find them if they're a curber."

If you're selling your car online, be very cautious any time someone offers more than the car is worth, said Bouchama.

He also recommends taking a bank draft or cash — never certified cheques because they're easily forged.

Consider setting up a temporary email and phone number to conduct the sale, and always bring someone with you when meeting a potential buyer.

"You never know who you're dealing with," said Bouchama. "There are some scary people out there, especially if you have a very nice car to sell."

An extreme example is the recent death of a 32-year-old Ontario man who was killed after he took two men for a test drive in the Dodge Ram truck he was selling.

Despite the fact that the Internet is an accessible platform for scammers and fraud artists, it also provides consumers with a wealth of information.

"If you want to know how much to pay, the Internet has really empowered buyers," said Iny. "It's made experts out of amateurs."

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Ah, the sweet sound of a crackling fire, the gentle orange glow and the woodsy smell of smoke. There’s nothing quite like a campfire to make your adventure complete. The following tips will help keep you safe and cozy.
  • 1. Know the Rules   Though it may be tempting to have a campfire where one is not permitted, camping rules and regulations were created for one reason - to keep you safe. Call ahead to make sure that campfires will be permitted where you want to stay. If not, and having a campfire is important to you, you might want to find another park.Keep in mind that fire rules can change on a daily basis depending on weather conditions. If a park posts "No open fires due to dry or windy conditions," always be sure to comply for the safety of all.
  • 2. Use Designated Fire Pits   If campfires are permitted, use the area that has been designated. These areas were chosen for a good reason (a good wind break, good brush clearance, etc.). If there is not a formal fire area, make sure that your fire ring is surrounded by a circle of rocks, large enough to keep wood and kindling contained and not blowing or tumbling over the sides.
  • 3. Clear Area of All Debris   Make sure there are no extraneous twigs, leaves, paper products or other flammables within several feet of your campfire. And don't forget to look up. Overhanging branches should be avoided.
  • 4. Use the Right Wood   Different kinds of wood are needed to make a great campfire. Start by gathering a supply of all three:Tinder, or small twigs, wood shavings, dry leaves or grass that will ignite easily, will help get your fire going. (Never use flammable liquids to start a fire!) Kindling, or small sticks one inch in diameter or less, go on next. Make sure to let your kindling get burning well before you add on the last kind of wood. The last kind? Your Fuel, or larger pieces of dry wood that burn for longer periods of time.Be sure to stack your wood in separate piles, well away from the fire area. Never pull branches off trees or cut living vegetation.
  • 5. Don't Over-Build.    Campfires can easily get away from you. Keep your campfire well within the borders of the pit, and keep it small to avoid sparking. You can always snuggle up to the fire (or each other) to keep warm.
  • 6. Be Ready to Put it Out   Be sure to have a bucket of water and a shovel or a fire extinguisher nearby.
  • 7. Be Safe   Enjoy your campfire, but be safe. Make sure an adult is present at all times, and discourage running or horse playing near a campfire.
  • 8. Douse, Dreg and Dig   Before leaving camp, make sure that your campfire is completely out-and that means doing more than just dousing it with water once or twice. Douse with water, dreg up the fire to uncover any hot spots and douse again. Finish up by turning over the fire debris to make sure everything is cold, and never put fire ash into trash receptacles. Check out the Smokey the Bear website,
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January Special: All RV units receive 3 extra years of warranty! All vehicles have a 90 day powertrain warranty!

 
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